December 4: Despite Drought, Aussie Chickpeas Harvest Still Huge

There hasn’t been a lot of rain in Australia this year.

However, the chickpeas crop coming from the Land Down Undaa isn’t that small

There hasn’t been a lot of rain in Australia this year.

However, the chickpeas crop coming from the Land Down Undaa isn’t that small

Pulse crops are noticeably smaller year-over-year but mostly larger in the grand scheme of things.  

Aussie chickpeas acreage in 2017/18, compared to the 5-year average, is 76% higher at 2.83 million acres.

That’s more than the acreage of American durum, oats, or barley this year!

It’s nearly equal to the amount of oats planted in Canada in 2016

However, the dry weather has had an impact on production.

In 2016/17, Australian producers planted 2.64 million acres of chickpeas and produced just over 2 million tonnes.

This year, in 2017/18, acreage was up by 7% to the previously-mentioned area of 2.83 million acres.

However, just over 1 million tonnes of chickpeas got harvested.

If you’re not picking up on the math, that’s nearly a 50% reduction in production, despite acres actually going higher!

Last year, 88% of those 2 million tonnes of Aussie chickpeas were exported. Might be it be the same this year?

What we do know is that there is a pretty big crop of pulses going into the ground in India this rabi / winter growing season.

Australia-wheat-harvest-lower
Australia wheat production downgraded again!
About the Author
Brennan Turner

Brennan Turner is the CEO of FarmLead.com, North America’s Grain Marketplace. He holds a degree in economics from Yale University and spent time on Wall Street in commodity trade and analysis before starting FarmLead. In 2017, Brennan was named to Fast Company’s List of Most Creative People in Business and, in 2018, a Henry Crown Fellow. He is originally from Foam Lake, Saskatchewan where his family started farming the land nearly 100 years ago (and still do to this day!). Brennan's unique grain markets analysis can be found in everything from small-town print newspapers to large media outlets such as Bloomberg and Reuters.